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VCB eNews Vol15,No2 - Remembrance

Velo Cape Breton update for cycling enthusiasts.

 

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"Men's lives are short .
The hard man and his cruelties will be
Cursed behind his back and mocked in death.
But one whose heart and ways are kind - of him
strangers will bear report to the whole wide world,
and distant men will praise him.

- Penelope in Robert Fitzgerald trans. THE ODYSSEY (364)”

 

Volume 15, #2 - Remembrance
 
IN THIS EDITION: 
  • Editorial:   Remembrance
  • Active Transportation Update
  • Christmas is Coming
  • New Executive
  • Loose Chain Links
  • About That Funny

 

EDITORIAL:  Remembrance

Can you remember your first two-wheeler, or when you first learned to ride a bike?  I don't remember whose bicycle it was, but I'm sure it was a hand-me-down from my older brother or sister.  We were living in Great Falls, Montana as my father had volunteered to be part of some sort of foreign military exchange program.  The streets  where we lived were laid out in very orderly rows and columns, called Avenues in one direction and Streets in the other.  Once I got over the initial wobbly-ness of my new riding skill, I proceeded to do laps around the block, around and around.  It was awesome!

Now this bike was "old-school", which of course made sense because it was a long time ago, somewhere about 1970 I would guess, and the bike had a full compliment of fenders, front and back.  So, being all of seven, and getting bored of riding around the block, I decided to mix it up a bit, I needed to get a little lower to the road; perhaps a more 'sporty' riding position.  So I sat on the back fender and rode around the block.  It was a bit of a stretch to reach the handlebars, but I made it work. I was Joe Cool.

That is, until I heard the neighbours comment, "it must be the Canadian way to ride a bicycle".  I proceeded around the corner, then, out of site, reverted back to the normal riding position, my coolness snapped back into its rightful non-existence, and my humble Canadian demeanor re-instated.

Its peculiar how our memories of events so long ago can be brought to the forefront of our minds with such clarity, as if they only happened yesterday.  With our Remembrance Day Ceremonies only recently passed, I think of our lost family members during past wars, and how this peculiarity


 
of remembering can be a blessing if the memory is pleasant, but perhaps a  curse if the memory is otherwise.  My father served in the Canadian Military for 30 years, and never saw active duty.  I am thankful for that, and for the sacrifice of our war veterans to have forged a lasting peace on Canadian soil that made it possible...but I never saw my Dad ride a bicycle.
 

 

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Construction of Multi-Use path near CBU. Photo: J. Cote

 

Active Transportation Update
 
As the construction season gets near the end for 2017 we checked in with CBRM (Cape Breton Regional Municipality)and TIR (Nova Scotia Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal) on the status of two local projects near and dear to cyclist’s hearts. Rick McCready, Senior Planner, Manager of Active Transportation Projects provided the following on the Grand Lake Road path and connector:
 
“Work is continuing on the final sections of the Grand Lake Road Multi Use Path, a 10 km. long, 3 m. wide paved pathway linking the Sydney and Glace Bay areas to Cape Breton University. The pathway, when complete, will permit cyclists to travel to the University while avoiding the heavy, high speed traffic along Grand Lake Road.  
The sections being completed this fall include approximately three kilometres of the main pathway between Reserve Mines and the Mayflower Mall, as well as the Cow Bay Road Connector Path, a 800 metre pathway linking the Mayflower Mall to Upper Prince Street in Sydney by means of the new Cow Bay Road overpass over Highway #125.
The total cost of the project is expected to be in the range of $3 million when complete, with the cost being shared between CBRM, ACOA, the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Green Municipal Funds, the Nova Scotia Department of Energy and the Nova Scotia Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage.
CBRM staff expect that the entire project should be completed by early December.”

Gerard Jessome, district director, TIR provided the following for Seaview Drive in North Sydney.
 
“We will install 1 meter paved shoulders on Seaview Drive.  Crews are adding gravel to existing shoulders now to increase the strength for extra pavement. Due to the limited width along the existing roadway, i.e. steep banks to the water, it was difficult to achieve this extra width.  We would have liked to get even wider paved shoulders but this would have been much more expensive.  Due to the added expense of the 1 m paved shoulder we had to split the project in half as we did not have enough funding allocated for the entire job.  We will complete the road next year.

In the end I think we will have another great piece of bike friendly infrastructure.”

 

Christmas is Coming...
 
Okay it’s mid-November time to think about gifts and here’s two ideas for the cyclists on your list.  The first, from Cycle Halifax let’s you gift your cyclist with a little something that supports cycling advocacy, so it’s a double win.
https://cyclehalifax.ca/2017/11/give-gift-cycling/
The second is from Patti Bornhym, a member of the Ramblers.  If you’re in the market for a cycling themed gift this might fit the bill.  You know you want bicycle doorknobs!
https://love2cycle.ca/

 

New Executive Lineup

The Annual General Meeting was held on November 2, 2017. Your executive for 2018 are as follows:

  • President - Paul Babin
  • Vice President - Vince Forrestall
  • Treasurer - Andree Crepeau
  • Secretary - Lisa Kuncewicz
  • Rides Captain - Rosalind Wright
  • Registrar - Steeve Messier
  • Member at Large - Britney MacNeil
  • Member at Large - Richard Wadden
  • Member at Large - Chris Milburn

 

Loose Chain Links

Interesting articles which we thought you, as a cyclist, may be interested. 

While winter is surely coming these tips will help you make the transition.  And who knows if you love fall cycling you might really like winter too. And just in case you want to move right into winter cycling here are some tips from an Edmonton cyclist.

If you have something you would like to share with the cycling community that is not an advertisement or blatant self promotion, please send it in.  We reserve the right to publish only those links we are sure that our readers may be interested in.

 

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Swap & Sale
For Sale: Velo cycling jersey, small, vg cond, $8
Women on Wheels cycling jersey, small, new cond, $10
Arm warmers $5
Contact / email ( gloriaac123@hotmail.com )

 

About that funny!
 
I’ve really had it with my dog: he’ll chase anyone on a bicycle.”
“So what are you going to do – leave him at the dog’s home? Give him away? Sell him?”
“No, nothing that drastic. I think I’ll just confiscate his bike.”

Geoff Kay
Driving one winter’s day, I spotted my mate chest-high in snow.
I shouted to offer him a lift but he said: “no thanks, I’m on the bike”.

Gareth Thomas
 
 
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November 17th,  2017
 

 
 

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